Advent Letter 2022

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Mourning and Melancholy

In the title essay of her collection of essays, When I Was a Child I Read Books, the author, Marilynne Robinson, recounts her days growing up accompanied by the inherent loneliness of Idaho landscape and the enduring positive benefit of this kind of loneliness. She notes that for Americans of a certain era such emotions as mourning, melancholy, regret, and loneliness were “high sentiments, as they were for the psalmist and for Sophocles, for the Anglo-Saxon poets and for Shakespeare.” Being a child of the Midwest with family still scattered across her hills and hollows along with a son who with his family live in Montana, Robinson’s essay was resonant.

All of this was brought to mind with the advent of Advent and having recently returned from a week in South Dakota where I was struck again by the beautiful loneliness of the post-harvest landscape – with winter settling in – and the long wait ‘til spring.

These high sentiments of mourning and melancholy and loneliness are often my companions. I experience them in the solitude of life. Sometimes in the poetry of a Herbert or Whitman or Donne, other times listening to the “who cooks for you?” of the owls and howls of the coyotes while walking through the chilly black woods under a full November moon.

Season of Advent

This week we, the church universal, mark the beginning of our church year with the season of Advent. The season of Advent is a season of preparation as we prepare to celebrate the birth of Christ. Our seasonal collects and hymns have as their backdrop the prophetic witness to the people of Israel waiting in their “lonely exile” for their Messiah. They mark as well our waiting in a lonely exile as a peculiar people for the Messiah’s second advent. The church calendar is meant to help us navigate the seasons of our lives. They can, at their best, give shape and rhythm to our spiritual life. They can, at their best, provide the opportunity to recognize and embrace aspects of our life we might wish to ignore – all within the context of the faith and our community of faith.

The season of Advent is a season of preparation as we prepare to celebrate Christ’s birth. We live as some have said, “in between the times.” Meaning that we live between the incarnation and the final consummation of Christ’s return And in this waiting, I experience the high sentiments of which Robinson wrote. I find myself saying often with the biblical writers, “Maranatha” – “come, Lord.” I find myself waiting and wondering with the Psalmist who asks, ‘how long?’ How long until our Lord’s triumphant Advent?

Navigating the Landscape of Our Soul

So, how can Advent help us navigate the landscape of our soul?

Well, we do know something of Christ as we await the final consummation. We are not left as orphans. He has come. He has given us His Spirit. And so, our waiting is a patient waiting (we heard quite a bit of this in our study of 1 & 2 Peter). Patient because we have confidence in Christ and His promise to return. Patient because of His promise that He will set all things right. Patient because of His promise that there will be a day and a place where there will be no more tears, a day and a place where we will see Him face-to-face. This confident patient waiting can give us – if and as we cooperate with the Spirit’s work in our lives – the opportunity to examine and address those hindrances and obstacles in our lives: our crooked paths, our rough places.

This waiting though is suffused with inherent loneliness and longing. A loneliness and a longing that allows one to, in Robinson’s words, “experience . . . radical singularity, one’s greatest dignity and privilege.” That allows one to navigate the landscape of the heart and soul and to discover again that our high sentiments and deepest desires are pointers that point to One thing – the One man, Christ Jesus – who alone is able to satiate our longing and desire.

Come, Lord Jesus.

In Christ,

+Steve

Steve Wood

Bishop, Diocese of the Carolinas

Archbishop Foley Beach’s Appeal for Ukraine Relief

 

ARCHBISHOP FOLEY BEACH’S APPEAL FOR UKRAINE RELIEF

Sisters and Brothers in Christ,

Lenten Greetings in the Name of Christ Jesus!  As we begin our Lenten pilgrimage, let us not ignore the humanitarian catastrophe unfolding before our eyes in Europe. Our hearts are breaking at the scenes of Ukrainians under attack from Russian forces with bombs landing in neighborhoods, schools, and playgrounds. Many of us have family and friends living and working in Ukraine or serving with the local church.

As the crisis intensifies and Ukrainians fight for their lives, more and more Ukrainians are being displaced and made homeless. Others will be without basic necessities like water, shelter, and food as basic infrastructure is destroyed. The Anglican Relief and Development Fund (ARDF) has mounted a campaign to raise funds to help. We are currently partnering with those inside Ukraine and those working in bordering countries being overwhelmed with refugees.

Are you able to help? ARDF has received a $100,000 challenge gift to match dollar for dollar the first $100,000 received. This means your personal gift can be doubled. Please consider helping today by clicking here.

Beyond giving financially to these efforts, your prayers are vital. Prayer really does make a difference! Pray for the Ukrainian people and their leaders, the Russian people and their leaders, the numerous Christian leaders and missionaries in the country, and for the hundreds of thousands of refugees. Ask God to intervene.

Please join us in praying these Collects from The Book of Common Prayer 2019:

“O God, our heavenly Father, whose blessed Son has taught us to seek our daily bread from you: Behold the affliction of your people in Ukraine and send them swift aid in their time of need. Increase the fruits of the earth by your heavenly benediction; and grant that receiving your gifts with thankful hearts, they may use them to your glory, for the relief of those in need, and for their own health; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.”

– Adapted from Collect, In Time of Scarcity and Famine, BCP2019, p.653

“Almighty God, from whom all thoughts of truth and peace proceed: Kindle, we pray, in the hearts of all people the true love of peace, and guide with your pure and peaceable wisdom those who take counsel for the nations of the earth; that in tranquility your kingdom may go forward, till the earth is filled with the knowledge of your love; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.”

– Collect For The Peace of the World, BCP2019, p. 654

Yours in Christ,


The Most Rev. Dr. Foley Beach
Archbishop and Primate, Anglican Church in North America

 

 

Welcome Church of the Apostles, Raleigh, NC

A LETTER FROM THE BISHOPS

NEW PARISH JOINS ANGLICAN DIOCESE OF CAROLINAS

 

October 8, 2020

 

Steve, David, Terrell, and Thad, bishops in the church by the will of God according to the promise of the life that is in Christ Jesus,
To our brothers and sisters in Christ:
Grace, mercy, and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord.

It is with great pleasure that we write informing you of the news that the Church of the Apostles, Raleigh, NC, has been admitted into the Diocese of the Carolinas.

Their transition into the Diocese of the Carolinas is the culmination of a season of conversation and prayerful discernment involving the leadership of the parish, Bishop Steve Breedlove of Christ our Hope, and our own diocesan bishop, Steve Wood.

While COTA is enthusiastic about the opportunity to join a geographical diocese and partner in mission with the Diocese of the Carolinas to see the gospel of Jesus Christ advance through mission and ministry, we are pleased to have a congregation of the maturity, wisdom, and strength that inheres COTA share in our common life.

We commend COTA to your prayers as we anticipate with joy the day we can resume the quality of common life that flows from face to face fellowship.

 

With every blessing and much love in Christ Jesus,

 

Bishop Steve Wood
Bishop David Bryan
Bishop Terrell Glenn
Bishop Thad Barnum

A letter from our ADOC Bishops

July 8, 2020

 

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Greetings in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.

For some time, we have discussed how our diocese might better organize itself for more fruitful mission and ministry. Given the geographic distances and challenges within our diocese we’ve considered different versions of deaneries, regions and oversight.

Early this year our bishops began talking, praying and discerning how it might work to develop a South Carolina area and a North Carolina area with two “Area Bishops” primarily focused on the mission and care of their respective areas, under the authority and oversight of Bishop Steve Wood, our Diocesan Bishop. Our hope is that having bishops resident in South and North Carolina will allow us to respond to and work with clergy and churches more rapidly and effectively.

Last week the Standing Committee approved funding to help make this happen. Under this new arrangement, Bishop David Bryan will be the Area Bishop for South Carolina and Bishop Terrell Glenn will move to Raleigh, NC and be the Area Bishop for North Carolina. Churches will still have the freedom to continue with their current bishop and we will attempt to honor any preferences and requests for visitations, etc. This will also apply to our parishes that are not in North or South Carolina. Bishop Thad Barnum will continue his work in Soul Care for all of our clergy.

We are grateful to serve alongside each of you in the Diocese of the Carolinas.

Warmly yours in the Lord,

Bishop Steve Wood
Bishop David Bryan
Bishop Terrell Glenn
Bishop Thad Barnum

 

 

The Diocese of the Carolinas       440 Whilden Street       Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464       843.424.6297